Theoretical and Natural Science

- The Open Access Proceedings Series for Conferences


Theoretical and Natural Science

Vol. 6, 03 August 2023


Open Access | Article

The inverse relationship between income and the prevalence of dementia in high-income nations

Shan Jiang * 1
1 University College London

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Theoretical and Natural Science, Vol. 6, 181-184
Published 03 August 2023. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Shan Jiang. The inverse relationship between income and the prevalence of dementia in high-income nations. TNS (2023) Vol. 6: 181-184. DOI: 10.54254/2753-8818/6/20230219.

Abstract

Dementia continues to be a serious problem worldwide. A negative relationship between the prevalence of dementia and the level of socioeconomic status (SES), such as income can be observed in most countries. The aim of the study in this paper is to explore the possible pathways that contribute to this negative relationship. This article analyses and presents three possible causes of health inequalities between SES gradients in dementia and possible solutions to them, through a large collection of articles. Differences in health literacy, housing levels and social support caused by SES such as different incomes lead to social inequalities in health through behavioral/cultural pathway, material pathway and psychosocial pathway respectively.

Keywords

dementia, SES, pathway, inequality, health

References

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the International Conference on Modern Medicine and Global Health (ICMMGH 2023)
ISBN (Print)
978-1-915371-65-2
ISBN (Online)
978-1-915371-66-9
Published Date
03 August 2023
Series
Theoretical and Natural Science
ISSN (Print)
2753-8818
ISSN (Online)
2753-8826
DOI
10.54254/2753-8818/6/20230219
Copyright
03 August 2023
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated